LESS STRESS, PLEASE


20130909-170615.jpg

 

To communicate effectively is to give and receive appropriate, accurate information.  The elements of the information chain are linked together.

action –> outcomes –> beliefs –> feelings –> intentions

Actions by one person typically produce material outcomes for the other.  In response to these outcomes, the second person develops thoughts about the first person, typically about their motives.  There is then some emotional response to this.  The second person forms an intention to act, arising partly from the emotional response.

Strength of Communication Skills

Skills developed in teacher training/ working as a teacher or personal tutor can usefully be transferred into other areas.

My background is in performing and this too has aided my ability to communicate effectively; developing listening skills, reading body language and seeing from a variety of perspectives.

As a teacher, I use expressive skills to give others information about their behaviour, and my beliefs, feelings and intentions.

Emotional Skills

Emotional skills enable me to say those things which need to be said, but which are difficult to say. For example, when conflict arises or when change needs to occur.

One such time was when a member of my team was not fulfilling his role; not writing appropriate Assignment Briefs or meeting Assessment deadlines. I made every effort to communicate my concerns, in a supportive manner, to uncover the underlying reason for this.

Support and guidance were offered and this was followed up, by mutual agreement, through email correspondence and one to one training.  I find that I can postpone my own concerns/ emotions until I understand the perspective of my student/colleague.

Listening Skills

I use Listening Skills to obtain information about the student/colleague. Mediation Training with LEAP has helped me to listen effectively and Cognitive Behavioural knowledge has given me a better perspective on how a person’s “truth” is shaped by their interpretation of the world and sense of self. This allows me to listen with greater understanding and compassion.

Dealing with Stress

Although I have high standards and in all areas of my life aim for perfection, I realise that this is never entirely possible. I am able to manage stress better now that I allow myself to fail. I look at the worst case scenario and put this into perspective; then I look at how to avoid this scenario.

I think before I react to situations, I am as prepared and organised as I can be in all professional situations and in using clear communication skills I can avoid conflict which may have arisen from misinformation.

Stress in itself is not a bad thing; it is important, however, to deal with stress appropriately and professionally. Personally, I believe that stress can be a motivator and, if correctly handled, can produce good results. I do, however, understand the need to create a balance between work and my personal life, where all aspects of my character are fulfilled. This in itself reduces stress.

Time Management

Good Time Management is vital with regards to dealing with stress. It is vital to organise and prioritise tasks. I have developed a system in which I list tasks to be done and set targets for achieving these goals. Targets need to be manageable and achievable; much like setting SMART targets for our students; I use this technique to ensure that work is covered and that no one task dominates my time.

In any given working week, I will be teaching each day, will have meetings with colleagues, communication with external colleagues/creative partners, support and guidance time with individual students – so knowing how best to prioritise work is vital.

Good preparation of Schemes of Work, Lesson Plans and creation of resources will mean less time worrying about what needs to be done from a teaching point of view. This creates time for unexpected guidance sessions with students who are in need of support or for time with staff to discuss any issues or concerns

In conclusion, as a Team Leader or Manager, managing YOUR time effectively can reduce the instances of stress that YOU might face. This means that YOU are in a better position to support YOUR team and, through clear communication, achieve YOUR desired outcomes for the team (learners and colleagues), the department and the business.

DAVID EQUALITY WATTERS

David Watters, a graduate of Napier University, Edinburgh, Trinity College of Music, London and the Institute of Education, University of London, has worked internationally within education and Educational Management for more than 20 years.
 
He has taught extensively within many socially and culturally diverse settings; most recently as a Head of Performing Arts within Further Education and is currently Course Leader for Music Performance and Equality & Diversity Coordinator at Andover College..
 
He is a personal and professional development associate with The Pacific Institute (www.pacificinstitute.co.uk), personal coach, freelance writer and founding member of NBI Associates.
 
He is a writer on social equality issues, is a key player in the Equal Love Campaign UK and author of the forthcoming book, NEVER BLEND IN which features key voices from the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender community and which aims to inspire and encourage those who may lack self-esteem or who question their validity.
 
David is currently promoting a youtube campaign“Give ‘em Hope” and is asking individuals, couples and groups to make and share videos telling about the benefits of living with personal authenticity.
 
He has shared a platform with Stuart Milk and Peter Tatchell and is a supporter of 17-24-30, The Trevor Project, Schools Out, The Terrence Higgins Trust, The Albert Kennedy Trust and The Harvey Milk Foundation.
 
His background in arts and education, combined with a solid understanding of Cognitive Behavioural Strategies, and his passion for Equality Advocacy drive every aspect of his work as a personal development facilitator, motivational speaker and writer.

 

 

 

Advertisements

About neverblendin

David Watters, a graduate of Napier University, Edinburgh, Trinity College of Music, London and the Institute of Education, University of London, has worked internationally within education and Educational Management for more than 20 years. He has taught extensively within many socially and culturally diverse settings; most recently as a Head of Performing Arts within Further Education. He is a personal and professional development associate with The Pacific Institute (www.pacificinstitute.co.uk), personal coach, freelance writer and founding member of NBI Associates. He is a writer on social equality issues, is a key player in the Equal Love Campaign UK and author of the forthcoming book, NEVER BLEND IN which features key voices from the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender community and which aims to inspire and encourage those who may lack self-esteem or who question their validity. David is currently promoting a youtube campaign"Give 'em Hope"and is asking individuals, couples and groups to make and share videos telling about the benefits of living with personal authenticity. He has shared a platform with Stuart Milk and Peter Tatchell and is a supporter of 17-24-30, The Trevor Project, Schools Out, The Terrence Higgins Trust, The Albert Kennedy Trust and numerous others. His background in arts and education, combined with a solid understanding of Cognitive Behavioural Strategies, and his passion for Equality Advocacy drive every aspect of his work as a personal development facilitator, motivational speaker and writer. View all posts by neverblendin

You must be logged in to post a comment.

%d bloggers like this: